Post-Privacy Economics

http://www.weigend.com/book/

Andreas Weigend challenges us to get over the simplistic and naive approach to privacy of our personal information (as in a futile attempt preventing it from going out into the world), and thrive, or even profit, from a controlled release and sharing (“to share is human”), and make use of the inevitable leakage of private information into the world.   It can be seen as a lose-lose combination, to hold private information so closely that nobody knows who or where you are, and you miss out on opportunities that are searching for you.   Is there a sale (ending tonight!) of your favorite (fill in the blank), and you didn’t know about it because nobody was able to identify you and let you know?

He outlines five tools that reward data creators with more decision-making power: the right to export data, the right to amend data, the right to blur data, the ability to “dial” personalization up and down, and the ability to see how changing inputs affects outputs.
Data for the people : how to make our post-privacy economy work for you 
Weigend, Andreas S., mediaName BOOK | Basic Books | 2017
One of the necessary tools that Weigend mentions is “the right to amend data” and correct a false record.   An obvious case is inaccurate information (was it a mistaken data entry point?  was it a misunderstanding?) in your credit file that harms you financially by reducing your credit score — clearly you should have a right to directly have that straightened out.  Travelers with names similar (or identical) to others on a no-fly list,  can find such erroneous data more than a little inconvenient.
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I heard Chris Poulin talk about leveraging social media and other public and contextual information about you, to help confirm your identity in a combined profile, or picture of who you are, rather than rely on, say, a simple username and complex password without context.  Each piece of information about a user reinforces and validates identity, so why not use it affirmatively rather than worry so much about some of it leaking out into the wide world?
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